Hackers Can Take Over Building Locks, Elevators, Electricity and More!

A major vulnerability was found in an industrial control system that is widely in use by the military, hospitals and other entities. If you were to know all about web privacy, you’d understand that an abysmal flaw like this would allow an attacker to control an electronic door lock (learn more from Payless Locksmith), elevators, boiler systems, lighting systems, video cameras, alarms, electricity and other crucial building functions. This could majorly affect various sectors and cause a considerable amount of damage from which to recover can be quite hard. Despite many businesses using the UK business electricity comparison and switching to get their electricity supply from a much more renewable source, this is one such factor which can only be fixed with much-heightened security.

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The issue is that a config file can be remotely accessed within the Tridium Niagara AX Framework that contains all of the systems configuration data such as usernames, passwords. If you knew how to utilize data visualization to lay it out on a chart, you’d know that this results in the ability to control all the systems managed by it. The platform is written in Java and in the last two years Cylance security researchers Billy Rios and Terry McCorkle  have reportedly found numerous vulnerabilities in the Tridium system along with other industrial control systems.

The flaw basically allows root access to the virtual machine that all of the Tridium software is running on. A backdoor module was developed that would allow for the system to continue to be accessed one it was initially attacked but naturally won’t be publicly released.

“We will be issuing a security patch that resolves the problem by Feb. 13 and are alerting our user community about this today,” spokesman Mark Hamel said in a statement. “The vast majority of Niagara AX systems are behind firewalls and VPNs — as we recommend — but clearly, as Rios and McCorkle have shown, there are many systems potentially at risk.”

The company has been aware of the issue since last December and has since then been working on a patch to fix the vulnerability expected to be released this month.

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Last year Tridium claimed attacks on its systems were unlikely because hackers don’t traditionally target obscure systems such as theirs. Quite an assumption for a platform that millions of control systems employ across the globe. With a critical environment such as this, a system would normally be locked down to only local access and restricted from the internet or other systems connected to the internet. Tridium’s documentation instead boasts that it’s ideal for remote management over the internet.

It’s a little scary because of the clients that use this system including: the FBI, Drug Enforement Agency, U.S. Marshals Services, the IRS, Passport Office along with many government offices and medical facilities. Imagine a hacker shutdown critical life systems in a hospital?

Massive and major companies/organizations are using these systems and there is no room for error in some cases. I guess it’s good that researchers found the exploit before a real attacker did and caused some real damage!

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